The DISabled to ENabled podcast
81. Matt Lafleur | Part 1: Friedrichs Ataxia

81. Matt Lafleur | Part 1: Friedrichs Ataxia

May 18, 2020

In this episode, we chat with Matt Lafleur about Friedrich's Ataxia and writing for Bio News. Learn more about Friedrich's Ataxia and the amazing things he's done despite it on the DISabled to ENabled podcast this week. 

 

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https://friedreichsataxianews.com/category/little-victories-a-column-by-matthew-lafleur/

Facebook - Matthew Lafleur

 

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Read the transcription of the episodes here: https://mmini.me/transcription

80. Lauren Freedman | Part 3: flamingos and mooning!

80. Lauren Freedman | Part 3: flamingos and mooning!

May 15, 2020

In this episode, we chat with Lauren Freedman about her Hashimoto's disease, sleep apnea, and anxiety. Learn more about Hashimoto's/sleep apnea and anxiety and how she went from acting to podcasting on the DISabled to ENabled podcast this week. 

Connect with Lauren:

uninvisiblepod.com

https://www.instagram.com/uninvisiblepod/

https://twitter.com/uninvisiblepod

https://www.facebook.com/uninvisiblepod/

Join our tribe of ENabled warriors who fight back against their symptoms!:

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Enter to WIN $100! Leave a review on iTunes, and each month we’ll choose one person at random to win. Here are some prompts to help you: who was your favorite guest and what did you learn from them? Will you listen to another episode? What did you like best about the show? 

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------------------------------------------

ENabled warriors thank you for supporting our sponsors. Today's episode is sponsored by BeeKeeper's Naturals. Start building your natural first aid kit today. Use code WARRIOR for 10% off your order.

 

79. Lauren Freedman | Part 2: uninvisible pod and medical gaslighting

79. Lauren Freedman | Part 2: uninvisible pod and medical gaslighting

May 13, 2020

In this episode, we chat with Lauren Freedman about her Hashimoto's disease, sleep apnea, and anxiety. Learn more about Hashimoto's/sleep apnea and anxiety and how she went from acting to podcasting on the DISabled to ENabled podcast this week. 

Connect with Lauren:

uninvisiblepod.com

https://www.instagram.com/uninvisiblepod/

https://twitter.com/uninvisiblepod

https://www.facebook.com/uninvisiblepod/

Join our tribe of ENabled warriors who fight back against their symptoms!:

Facebook / ENabled Warriors  Insta: @ DISabledtoENabled twitter @DISabletoenable

 

Want to tips for managing your symptoms? Check out our blog: www.DISabledtoENabled.com 

 

Join the VIP waitlist to get the ENabled Warrior Tracker before anyone else click here to join through Facebook Messenger: http://mmini.me/waitlist

 

Enter to WIN $100! Leave a review on iTunes, and each month we’ll choose one person at random to win. Here are some prompts to help you: who was your favorite guest and what did you learn from them? Will you listen to another episode? What did you like best about the show? 

Click here to learn how to leave a review on desktop and on a Phone. Android users may need to download the apple podcasts app

 

Read the transcriptions of the episodes here

------------------------------------------

ENabled warriors thank you for supporting our sponsors. Today's episode is sponsored by BeeKeeper's Naturals. Start building your natural first aid kit today. Use code WARRIOR for 10% off your order.

 

*COVID 19 Special | Natalie Wilson: virtual support and hobbies*

*COVID 19 Special | Natalie Wilson: virtual support and hobbies*

May 12, 2020

0:00
Enabled warriors, welcome to another edition of the special Coronavirus

0:04
episodes. We are here today

0:06
with Natalie Wilson and her episode will be coming out really really soon. So Natalie is a fundraising gal. Natalie works for EDS UK and wanted to have a bit of a chat about how the Coronavirus is affecting charities and in particular support groups. So hey, hey, Natalie, how you doing today?

0:24
Yeah, very well. Thank you. Awesome. So

0:27
let's have a quick chat about how you think COVID is affecting the sort of face to face meetups that you would normally have had with EDS patients.

0:38
Yeah, definitely. So I mean, part of a big part of a charity and what we do is support you know, everyone in the local communities with Ehlers danlos Syndrome, and we have a network across the K and of volunteers that run kind of physical support group meetings and As well as working on the fundraising manager for charity, but as well as working for the charity, I've also always volunteered to run my local support groups. I did this a long time before I started working for charity. And so I've always run physical support groups, and quite Luckily, about six months ago, and because of the nature of the condition, and the charity started running a few online and it was very much meant to be kind of a trial, you know, try get everything working, yeah, see if they work and that, you know, only started at the beginning of this year. And, and obviously, you know, since kind of all of the lockdown and kind of social isolation, isolation of them COVID all of the physical support groups have had to stop and and, you know, over These a lot of people in our community, sometimes the only time they come out for houses is to come to the support group meetings, you know, it's a big thing for them. And, and luckily, we've managed to move a lot of our support group meetings online. And I and it's funny funny, we're talking about this today because I ran my first local one last night. And the charity has been doing a lot of kind of more national things. So we've been having things like puzzle clubs and book clubs. Again, we've got a session every week that anyone can come and chat about their anxieties. But yeah, so coffee. So a lot of areas are having things like coffee mornings and things like that. And so I had I have my first proper meeting, you know, last night and it was good. We've talked a lot about kind of worries. And and it's very much you know, Normal support group meeting would be to talk about the problems with your conditions and you know where you can get help. And does anyone have any advice for me doing this, this and this but last night, it was very much that mixed with kind of COVID anxieties, and I think it hit God Of course, it's hit everyone really hard. It's hit, you know, lots of communities but for people with Ehlers danlos Syndrome, you know, a lot of people are seeing physios regularly and they're having help with massage regularly and you know, any anything that they're kind of doing is very much often supported by other people helping them in daily life. And, you know, cleaners and carers although care is obviously still still very much helping and, and our chat last night, kind of moved on to how can people start doing things themselves. You know, and a lot of people are having online meetings though zoom calls is kind of what we've been using to charity with their local physio, and to help them with new exercises or what exercises they should be doing now. And a lot of people last night in my meeting, we're talking about kind of like, self massage and how they're kind of relieving the aches and pains their muscles, so it was, yeah, it was quite a different meeting. And, but it's, it was good, and it was nice. And it and there was actually people in my meeting last night that have never been able to come to a physical meeting. Yeah, aren't travelled or they can't drive or it's even though I do the I do the Thames Valley area, but it was, you know, a little bit too fast and to come. And so it was amazing. I was managing or we weren't charity managing to support people that haven't felt supported before. Hmm,

4:57
that's really good.

4:58
Yeah, but I just Same time, it It wasn't the same as a physical meeting, you know, people can't go off and chat easily and it was very much. There was one conversation, whereas it support group meetings, although there's one main conversation people do break off and, and have little chats and support each other. But

5:21
yeah, it's a little bit of a different kind of social dynamic in that sense, isn't it?

5:26
Yeah, definitely. But it was still absolutely hugely supportive. And which was which was amazing. And it was, it was really needed. And I I really do hope that as a charity, we're making quite a big difference in how people are coping with anxieties but also, we're giving people tools you know, for other things to do and other things to think about. And, you know, there's a crafting group and I keep seeing people post all of the you know, all of their crafts online and things like that, and it's it's really nice is positive.

6:01
Yeah, that's really good. And I think taking up a project, like a craft project or something else like that it's really beneficial for just kind of keeping your anxiety at bay and kind of being able to have something to focus on, you know?

6:16
Yeah, definitely. I mean, I think God - gardening and so, eh, it's funny. I'm actually and a couple of weeks ago, I think I was probably struggling a little bit. I think I didn't want to stop living slightly different now. I'm quite an outdoors person inside all the time. But now I'm too busy. I've got too many projects, too many projects on. I don't know which one I'm going to pick this evening on.

6:46
I start to have too much than too little going on, I think,

6:50
Oh, definitely. And they're, you know, they're all very positive things and things I actually I feel like I want to do them now. Whereas a couple of weeks ago when we were starting out this kind of lockdown journey. I was I think I was reluctant to, to pick too many indoor tasks, but no, I'm definitely I'm starting to enjoy it.

7:13
And how we find it working from home as well, because for a lot of people, that's a completely new experience. That's also the hard thing about zoom is the fact that everybody in the house is on a zoom call all the time. You know,

7:25
shut up.

7:28
Yeah, that's pretty funny. So I work from home normally, and I only go into the now working part time, and I only go into the office and only one day a week. So I'm not I'm quite lucky in that I was fully set up to work from home. And actually, it's been really nice for me because we didn't do a lot of this online stuff as a we're very our charities very small team. And we didn't do a lot of this online stuff before but now I get to see everyone all the time. You know, whenever we're And it's quite I feel more connected. Although I'm not going to the office, I feel more connected to the rest of the team when I'm at home now because I think everyone else has started to understand kind of home working. And I've been really lucky because I had everything set up before. And I think a lot of people especially with conditions like us, they probably have the right desk and the right chair and everything and the right computer all set up at work. And, and it's been I've known I know, for my husband, it's definitely been a challenge to provide a comfortable working environment for him at home. And we have to be in completely different places in the house because we're both always on on calls. And then the funny thing is in our house, so I've obviously I've always worked from home. We have two dogs, they always sat by my side. They've now become complete traitors. Oh no. They spend most of their day and my husband new office. I'm so typical. They only come to me when they need letting out of the back door, which is, unfortunately quite constant. But though it's, it's quite funny, so I've adapted quite well. And I definitely, you know, it's been it's been harder for my husband because he's he only he used to work from home one day a week when I used to go into the office. Yeah, I think definitely missing those kind of social chats but he you replace it, you end up you know, calling your work colleagues and things instead.

9:37
Yeah, it's about making adaptations, isn't it? It's all we've got to do. We have no choice but to do that right now.

9:43
Yeah, definitely. I think and I'm staying positive. I know it's not Yeah, it's nice in the same way but I'm definitely I think the most things we all are missing our friends and family

9:59
are missing. meals out as well. Oh my god never cooked so much more math.

10:06
Yeah, I think Yeah, definitely. I mean, I'm not too much I'm definitely missing we quite often go to my parents for a race dinner every Sunday. We'll go we leave them the dogs when we go out on a long bike ride, and then go back for raced in, and I'm definitely, definitely missing that. And my my mum's got a chronic form of leukaemia, she's she's very well and very healthy, but it puts her in a very high risk group. And so I think the reality for our family is that even when lockdown finishes, it's not going to be for everyone. It's not going to be straight back into normality. You know, it's going to be a very long time before it's safer for our family to go back to normal in the same way it will be for you know, a lot of families in the UK.

10:56
Yeah, definitely. I mean, that's the other thing as well. It's like what is normal anymore looks more normal. Isn't it completely changed?

11:02
Oh 100% and i think i think it will take us quite a while to start trusting things again in different social situations. And I think, you know, there's a lot of people that were suffering with social anxieties and things anyway. This is just gonna exasperated a huge amount, but it'll be I think it'd be very interesting to kind of see what what happens like, I think I'll find it interesting how I'll react because I've got no idea how I'm gonna react to anything so alone, other people,

11:37
it's funny you say like, because I was thinking about that today. And I thought, you know, I'm thinking about like, going out more and like missing certain things and stuff, but when it actually time actually comes to do that. I'll probably be like, so overwhelmed by all the sounds and the lights and the smells and they'll just be like, Oh my god, I can't do

11:53
this. I'll go back home. You know,

11:58
as well like So, yeah, definitely I think

12:02
I've had because I've had periods in my life I haven't been as well as I am now. And I've been indoors a lot. And it's actually it's funny. It's kind of taken me back to those times. And I remember after having had periods in hospital, that going outside and being on busy streets and being in busy places was really overwhelming. Yeah, almost forget how to cross busy roads. Like, it's like putting someone from the north coast of Scotland and certainly transporting them into London.

12:35
And it's, you know, we just haven't had that big enough. Have we? And it's

12:41
Yeah, it's gonna take us a little while to get used to it again. Definitely. Yeah.

12:46
Interesting.

12:48
Thank you so much for sharing it and sharing that with us today in our lives. It's been absolutely amazing. is listening and stay safe, stay healthy and stay enables. Thanks, Natalie. Bye

78. Lauren Freedman | Part 1: hashimoto’s and sleep apnea

78. Lauren Freedman | Part 1: hashimoto’s and sleep apnea

May 11, 2020

In this episode, we chat with Lauren Freedman about her Hashimoto's disease, sleep apnea, and anxiety. Learn more about Hashimoto's/sleep apnea and anxiety and how she went from acting to podcasting on the DISabled to ENabled podcast this week. 

Connect with Lauren:

uninvisiblepod.com

https://www.instagram.com/uninvisiblepod/

https://twitter.com/uninvisiblepod

https://www.facebook.com/uninvisiblepod/

Join our tribe of ENabled warriors who fight back against their symptoms!:

Facebook / ENabled Warriors  Insta: @ DISabledtoENabled twitter @DISabletoenable

 

Want to tips for managing your symptoms? Check out our blog: www.DISabledtoENabled.com 

 

Join the VIP waitlist to get the ENabled Warrior Tracker before anyone else click here to join through Facebook Messenger: http://mmini.me/waitlist

 

Enter to WIN $100! Leave a review on iTunes, and each month we’ll choose one person at random to win. Here are some prompts to help you: who was your favorite guest and what did you learn from them? Will you listen to another episode? What did you like best about the show? 

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------------------------------------------

ENabled warriors thank you for supporting our sponsors. Today's episode is sponsored by BeeKeeper's Naturals. Start building your natural first aid kit today. Use code WARRIOR for 10% off your order.

 

77. Paul Ace | Part 3: miracle morning and playing music

77. Paul Ace | Part 3: miracle morning and playing music

May 8, 2020

In this episode, we chat with Paul Ace about his wife's (that's me!) diagnosis of Multiple sclerosis aged 22 and how that affected us both. Learn more about Multiple sclerosis and how we got through it on the DISabled to ENabled podcast this week. 

Join our tribe of ENabled warriors who fight back against their symptoms!:

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------------------------------------------

ENabled warriors thank you for supporting our sponsors. Today's episode is sponsored by BeeKeeper's Naturals. Start building your natural first aid kit today. Use code WARRIOR for 10% off your order.

 

76. Paul Ace | Part 2: needles and being logical

76. Paul Ace | Part 2: needles and being logical

May 6, 2020

In this episode, we chat with Paul Ace about his wife's (that's me!) diagnosis of Multiple sclerosis aged 22 and how that affected us both. Learn more about Multiple sclerosis and how we got through it on the DISabled to ENabled podcast this week. 

Join our tribe of ENabled warriors who fight back against their symptoms!:

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Join the VIP waitlist to get the ENabled Warrior Tracker before anyone else click here to join through Facebook Messenger: http://mmini.me/waitlist

 

Enter to WIN $100! Leave a review on iTunes, and each month we’ll choose one person at random to win. Here are some prompts to help you: who was your favorite guest and what did you learn from them? Will you listen to another episode? What did you like best about the show? 

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------------------------------------------

ENabled warriors thank you for supporting our sponsors. Today's episode is sponsored by BeeKeeper's Naturals. Start building your natural first aid kit today. Use code WARRIOR for 10% off your order.

 

*COVID Chat | Brad Dell : ritual self care*

*COVID Chat | Brad Dell : ritual self care*

May 5, 2020

0:00
Enabled Warriors, we are here with Brad Dell to have a quick chat about the corona virus that's going on. It's taking-- well it has taken, let's say over the world right now. And everything's kind of working out and it's a little bit crazy. So let's find out how things are where Brad is in California. So how are you finding things right now, Brad?

0:21
I'm, so far I've been pretty at peace, because I've been able to read a lot. And I've always wanted more time, sorry, ever. I'm trying to be more empathetic to the struggles of those around me. And when I do think about the things that are happening, I feel a lot of anxiety. I've been very privileged to be taken care of and to still have my job, but I know that many other people are suffering and that's very anxiety inducing to think about. Yeah,

0:51
yeah, totally. And have you been doing doing things like limiting the news and kind of trying to do more meditation or anything like that? Have you kind of found any coping mechanisms.

1:01
Yeah, so I have what I call a ritual list. And that list is basically kind of like a bullet journal where I mark off the things that I did each day. And so I have items like yoga or meditation or did I drink my three cups of coffee and, you know various things that helped me calm down. And so I'm strictly following that list and keeping focused on self care.

1:27
I love that that's awesome. Well, what what are things like in California right now what they kind of advising and telling you to do and stuff?

1:34
Yes, so... California was one of the first states in America to shelter in place where we have to stay locked down in our houses. And because of that, we have significantly flattened the curve. We are doing very well right now in comparison to the rest of the US and we have no idea when it will end but thankfully California because of the industries that we have, a lot of people are able to do remote work. So we better off than most states in the US and doing well. Yeah.

2:04
Cool. That's pretty good. So, are they kind of all the states kind of competing against each other, like you can flatten the curve? and things like that.

2:12
Yeah, America is naturally very competitive in itself. So states are all you know, who's doing better? Who's doing better?

2:21
Okay, that's not a bad thing. If it can, you know,

2:24
it's great in this case.

2:26
And, uh, but um, well, it's not really changed for you as much. But you kind of work from home anyway.

2:32
Yeah, yes, I already work at home. I usually I work in coffee shops. And I get a lot more exercise and so I'm trying to fix things and get a lot more exercise be more active. It's really showing when I tried to sleep at night and I have so much pent up energy. I can't even close my eyes.

2:50
Oh, gosh. That is one thing that I'm missing is going to coffee shops and working in there because like, yeah, it gets a bit relentless, isn't it?

2:58
Yes, yeah.

3:00
I'm also really missing meals out this week. I don't know why this week in particular, but like every time I get to cook something I'm like, yeah. So yeah. So how do you think the COVID virus has really affected you up till now?

3:15
So it's involves a lot of logistical changes. I normally stay in a house with three housemates and all of them are essential workers. And so that wasn't really going to work for me because I'm immunocompromised. So if they're going out more chance that they'll bring the virus soon. So thankfully, I have a very, very generous family at my church, and they have a very nice guest house that they've allowed me to stay in. Since I've been staying there, emotionally, I think kind of the biggest problem has been a lot of burden marrying a lot of people. They know that I've been through isolation, that for about eight months during my transplant journey, I was in what right now sheltering in place. So a lot of people are coming to me for help with their anxiety and everything. And happy to help. But there comes a point where you have to draw boundaries so you don't overwhelm yourself. So I'm going to do that now. That's kind of the hardest challenge right now.

4:16
Yes, to kind of manage your own anxiety say that you can help other people.

4:20
Exactly. Yeah. Selfish to self care. Yeah,

4:24
I really do think that's one of the hardest things.

4:28
Yeah, cuz I know I've written a lot of columns on like, trying to stay positive and all that sort of stuff. And sometimes you yourself do not feel positive, but you're like, I've got to, you know, make such an effort to be positive to so I can help other people. And I think, yeah, it's one of the hardest things to really push through. And

4:47
yes, personally.

4:50
It's crazy. Do you think there'll be any positive things coming from this whole virus experience in the future?

4:58
Yeah, so you know, In my self care, I've been embracing slowness and stillness and silence and intentional solitude. And for me, I feel like a lot of people, we try to distract ourselves from the challenges that we have our mental struggles. And I think it's important for us to really sit with those thoughts and process them, rather than suppress them through distraction. So I'm hoping that people will learn that, you know, this slowness and stillness is not necessarily a bad thing. That in our world where we are constantly having our phones at hand, and we always want to distract ourselves, it's good to sit and just be with ourselves and know ourselves and really think things through and be introspective. So I'm hoping people learn that during this time that they've actually imported their phones and just sit with themselves. And I'm also hoping that we come out that some people have a new empathy for those who have chronic conditions that they can realise Oh, when you know So isolates himself during the flu season picks it up their immune system. I know that's like no and I can't believe they go through that every year. I want to reach out and be a better support for them. Or maybe, you know, they realise the paranoia being around a bunch of germs all day. And they realise, oh, this is someone else's everyday life, this isn't new for them. Now I understand now I want to be better support. So I'm hoping that out of this comes empathy, empathetic support. So I'm hoping, hoping in America that like, healthcare wise we get it together, that we realised that we shouldn't be attaching our insurance to employment. Instead every person should be taken care of as a human right.

6:45
Yeah, totally. Totally. And this, this is still that that thing in America as well where all of the kind of healthy produce and things and shops and coffee shops and like grocery store is still far more more expensive than the kind of processed stuff. Do you think that'll change? Maybe? I'd hoped that it would Hmm.

7:08
I think there will be.

7:11
I'm not sure in terms of natural produce, I think there will be a change of thought in how we handle the supply of foods. I guess like as an example, right now we have a surplus as they call it of milk and eggs. And rather than give those to the needy, instead, they're pouring out the milk and crushing the eggs. To them a surplus merely means there's items that they can't sell. They don't think of it as these are items that we could give to people who actually need it. So I'm hoping that moving forward, I'm not sure if that's a problem in other countries, but in America, I'm hoping that we move forward and realise that if there's a surplus that means Notice that we have an opportunity to care for other people and give to people who are hungry.

8:05
Yeah, totally. And that that's that's something that's that's huge and it needs to be, you know, addressed out this whole thing for sure.

8:13
Mm

8:15
hmm. It's crazy. I remember what my brother calls the virus. Do you wanna hear? Yes? My little brother is calling this whole thing. The Apocalypse. He keeps messaging me he messaged me every day and I never hear from him for months normally, but he messaged me every day and he's like, yeah, after this apocalypse. Oh, but you wanna go and do this? Yeah, after the apocalypse is over. That's actually really nice that this this whole kind of thing is actually brought us together, like closer together as brother and sister.

8:46
Yes, yeah. I think we'll have a newfound gratitude for a community of all types from the family.

8:53
Yeah. And I can say for sure that I am going to get no work done when this is over because family going to be picnics let's go and do this. Let's go down to the river that's

9:05
I'm just gonna like I do have to work.

9:08
Yeah, yeah. Nice goes on maybe differently. Yeah,

9:13
I don't know.

9:16
So there we go that was the Coronavirus chat for the day. Thanks so much Brad and Brad's episode soon on the disabled to enabled podcast

 

 

75. Paul Ace | Part 1: my partner’s diagnosis

75. Paul Ace | Part 1: my partner’s diagnosis

May 4, 2020

In this episode, we chat with Paul Ace about his wife's (that's me!) diagnosis of Multiple sclerosis aged 22 and how that affected us both. Learn more about Multiple sclerosis and how we got through it on the DISabled to ENabled podcast this week. 

 

Join our tribe of ENabled warriors who fight back against their symptoms!:

Facebook / ENabled Warriors  Insta: @ DISabledtoENabled twitter @DISabletoenable

 

Want to tips for managing your symptoms? Check out our blog: www.DISabledtoENabled.com 

 

Join the VIP waitlist to get the ENabled Warrior Tracker before anyone else click here to join through Facebook Messenger: http://mmini.me/waitlist

 

Enter to WIN $100! Leave a review on iTunes, and each month we’ll choose one person at random to win. Here are some prompts to help you: who was your favorite guest and what did you learn from them? Will you listen to another episode? What did you like best about the show? 

Click here to learn how to leave a review on desktop and on a Phone. Android users may need to download the apple podcasts app

 

Read the Transcriptions of the episodes here

------------------------------------------

ENabled warriors thank you for supporting our sponsors. Today's episode is sponsored by BeeKeeper's Naturals. Start building your natural first aid kit today. Use code WARRIOR for 10% off your order.

 

74. Hanna Boethius | Part 3: dreaming about sugar!

74. Hanna Boethius | Part 3: dreaming about sugar!

May 1, 2020

0:00
Hey Enabled Warriors. Welcome back to part three. We are here today with Hanna with us to find out for her not so not so super quick sequence. Again anyways, we've talked about some heavy stuff in the previous couple of episodes, let's have a little bit of fun show what is still possible after a diagnosis or an accident. This part of the show is where we find out a little bit more about personality of our guests with some not so super quick secrets. Let's see how this goes. Ready for this, Hanna?

0:27
I am

0:29
Yeah. Okay most inspiring book that you've ever read

0:33
your medical book, probably Dr. Bernstein's the diabetes solution. I know that there's a huge controversy about this book, but it's the one that that showed me that it is possible to live a fully healthy, happy life with diabetes. If you just make a few changes.

0:53
Ah,

0:54
I would say the book that I keep on returning to And this is also this is definitely not medical, but it is the alchemist by Paulo Coelho.

1:07
Oh, very nice. Very nice.

1:09
I love the story. And you know the deeper meanings but the story is beautiful.

1:15
I've never read that one. I'm reading it.

1:17
It's a good tip. Hmm.

1:19
Okay, what is the weirdest thing you've ever done?

1:22
Oh my god. I do so many things.

1:26
I love but it's difficult to

1:31
to choose, but I would say and I'm sure my fellow people with diabetes can really agree with me on this one. When your blood sugar is really low. You can do some funky stuff like okay, like it's it can be very very I mean, in all tragedy have a very low blood sugar tragically critically low blood sugar and you have to be able to see the humour part. it afterwards. So there was this one time when I was very, very much younger than this. I was at the train station here where we were live. And I noticed that something was off. And this was when I maybe didn't have so much good control of my own blood sugars. So I'm like, okay, shit, you know, I'm low blood sugars. stupidly low. So I went to a grocery store, I picked up a bottle of juice, and instead of just chugging it, I was going to be a good person actually go pay for it first. This of course, landed me in hospital and by ambulance, but I also remember trying to pay with my blood sugar testing kit wallet. So that was one from quite a long time ago. That's weird and stupid. But you know, I've learned since then, another one, which was actually embarrassingly recently. Yeah. Anyway, I woke up from a dream Like it was a very, very vivid dream and I was at an event with some people I know from the diabetes community, he would never really met but they were all very my dream. Okay. And, and I saw that there was wasn't really an option for me to eat anything at this event. It was all sort of Yeah, it was all I don't remember what kind of food it was, I just in my mind, there was nothing for me to eat. So I drink that I took a huge amount of insulin to cover for all these carbs and sugars and stuff that was in front of me and on the table. And I woke up and I'm like, I felt that I was super low and I'm like, Oh my god, I just took that huge dose of insulin. What am I going to do? Although I never took the dose of insulin because that wasn't my dream. And I was just really mostly dreaming about sugar literally, throwing me, but I was just, you know, just trying for the life for me to try To make the calculation of okay, because I took that huge dose of insulin and how many carbs for me to eat now I don't, I can't I don't understand it. So sitting there, instead of treating the critically low blood sugar, I was just sitting there trying to calculate and my brain is not working. Oh, yeah. I'll give you two for the good fun, I guess.

4:25
Thanks a lot. Appreciate that. Nice.

4:29
So what is the best place you've ever visited?

4:32
Oh, well.

4:34
I have been fortunate enough to travel a lot in my life and travel to a lot of wonderful places. And for I would say actually the best place in terms of both people and food and weather because I'm definitely a more warm weather person than a cold weather person. And it would probably Sri Lanka is a beautiful little paradise island are actually quite big but it's a beautiful person.

5:09
Nice nice, ya

5:12
know it's it's very very beautiful and it's quite accessible actually so it's very nice but there are so many I have so many favourite cities in the world I think every city I visit becomes my favourite. So this is a little bit of a tougher question. I could happily you know spend considerable amount of time I used to live in London actually before when I was studying but I would love to try it again with money this time and not as a student have been nice. I could live in Paris, I can live in Palma Majorca. I could live in New York. I could live in Miami, in Austin, all these places.

5:54
I love the city and I'm like

5:58
my favourite Your favourite every time I go anywhere.

6:04
So what do you think is the scariest thing you've ever done?

6:07
scariest thing and probably others to one medical one, which is going against the grain of all recommendations, medical recommendations that I've gotten, which is the whole food party how I started developing my lifestyle sort of Formula around diabetes and took it. And the other scariest thing is probably starting my businesses. Yes, if I knew if I would have known how much work it takes from the beginning, like if someone would have told me how much work it takes in the beginning of me starting First they diabeetus one and then the event one or the sort of event for me up and I probably would never have started. Yeah, and I mean Freedom is definitely worth it and, you know, getting to choose where I work from and all of this stuff, but just the scary and like the responsibility part of it and the money side of everything. And you know, some months are a little more cutthroat than others, maybe. But

7:17
yeah, I know there is this upset. That's true. Everything though, isn't nice. It's definitely balanced. And then I think sometimes I feel like that quite often. I'm just like, ah, is it is it worth it is so hard. Yeah. But then I kind of think, you know, if I have the skill, to be able to actually go and help people is more worthwhile, you know? Exactly. That's what yeah.

7:42
Yeah, it's really important to find your why and why you're doing it. Oh, yeah. And for the diabetes, one is clear. I want to improve the lives of diabetics everywhere. Yeah. And for the event, one, you know, I'm like, Well, I can really help people improve their health and that's my ultimate goal in everything that I do, and Want to just improve people, whether they're diabetics or not? To improve their health? Yeah,

8:04
totally. It's just such a big wide. It's amazing.

8:09
If you could do one thing to help people with chronic illnesses right now, what would it be?

8:14
healed them, but I think that's a little too big of them. Yeah, I would actually take them away.

8:23
For free, just make them go away.

8:27
Go away. We don't like you anymore. And no, but a realistic thing I would want to do is to really, we spoke a lot about it in the last episode, but really to fight for patients right to be heard, in terms of making their own choices. I love that. That is awesome.

8:48
That's great. Oh, thank you so much. So So where can the Warriors find out more about you and what you do?

8:53
I'm sure you'll list all these in your notes, but you can find me on Facebook. And Instagram on Hanna diabetes expert can find me on Twitter, kind of Diab experts because the name was too long. And you can also visit my webpage Hannah booties.com, where I actually upload a type one Thursday, every sort of week. And that's also actually live on Twitter on Instagram and Facebook every week at 6pm. Central European Time, life. So you get to see all my element.

9:34
So do you do teach live there twice a week?

9:37
No. A week? On Thursdays? Yeah. And then I uploaded onto my blog a little bit. I do it later. Yeah. And I'll happily take questions from the audience for these as well. So Oh, yeah. Awesome.

9:51
Thank you so much for coming on the show today. I know we've had so much fun. And that's so much from you. It's been awesome. Thank you for having me. Thank you for being here. Whereas this thing if you've enjoyed this episode, then please leave a comment below and tell us what you like best. And while you're there, click the subscribe or follow button wherever you're listening and who do you know who should listen to this podcast? Go and drop them the link right now. Remember warriors stay enabled. See you later Hannah. Bye. See you. Thank you. Bye

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