The DISabled to ENabled podcast
59. David Francisco | Part 3 man’s search for meaning and crab brain soup

59. David Francisco | Part 3 man’s search for meaning and crab brain soup

March 27, 2020

RED+GUITAR+CROP.jpg?format=1000w

 

Mans search for meaning - victor frankle Click here to get your copy: https://mmini.me/meaning

 

Weirdest thing: Tried crab brain in Japan, brown soup served in the crab. 

 

The place to visit - Japan/Thailand/New Zealand. Japan’s amazing food. Thailand - coffee, NZ for nature

 

Fun fact: Japanese people eat KFC Christmas dinner, how cool is that? 

 

Scariest thing - Trying to ride a tandem bike with his wife. His legs weren’t strong. Fun fact, they got really good at it and even did a bike ride 200 miles from San Fran to LA the ‘DF ride for hope.’

 

Connect with David Francisco: 

www.DavidFranciscomusic.com 

Book and album are available spotify, apple music and all other good music platforms

 

Social media search: @davidfranciscomusic

 

Sick of negative Facebook groups?

Join the ENabled tribe:

Search Facebook or click: ENabled Warriors 

Or search Insta: DISabledtoENabled

 

Join the VIP waitlist to get the ENabled warrior Tracker Journal before anyone else click here to join through Facebook Messenger: http://mmini.me/waitlist

 

 hero_3200x1200_f7e0cc8b-300a-44a4-a348-e

This episode is sponsored by our friends at Beekeepers Naturals. Check out their natural medicine cabinet full of all-natural medicines that bees make.  Use code WARRIOR for 10% off.

58. David Francisco | Part 2 I forgave the person who paralysed me, now I teach kids about it in schools

58. David Francisco | Part 2 I forgave the person who paralysed me, now I teach kids about it in schools

March 25, 2020

 

David says he feels grateful for the learning. Within 4 months he’d learned so much about who he was and he’d become far stronger. He says through the whole thing he has found purpose in what happened and that he feels grateful he has a story and a purpose to share with others. He wouldn’t take it back at this point. He’s been sharing his story at high schools and the importance of driving safely as the person that hit him was distracted. 

 

It also gives him a lot of content to write about. He’s written a whole album about his accident which also comes with a book that goes hand in hand. The book describes the backstory of how he created the album and describes how and why he recorded the song the way he did. 

 

Every song is from after the crash. He documented his whole recovery through his music and the album reflects everything he went through. 

 

He went back to the audio school where he started learning before the accident. 

 

He went from feeling like everything was gone forever. And now he feels ridiculously blessed with everything he’s been able to do such as being on the Ellen show. 

 

If there’s something I could do to get my legs working again I'm gonna do it, I'm gonna try. 

 

Always choose to fight and always forgive. 

 

Forgiving the driver that hit him.

 

The driver didn’t intentionally paralyze him. David mentions how the driver was not in a good place at the time, she was a heavy drug user, she was on bipolar meds, she was driving whilst distracted. It was her fault. That cost him what he thought was everything but he knew forgiveness can bring light to any situation. People have said when they heard the story ‘i hope she's in jail’. The point is how you respond to the situation. He chose forgiveness and she's now off drugs and turning her life around. It freed David's mind so he could focus on his own recovery. She was so depressed that she overdosed, and woke up in the hospital. She found out he forgave her and he went and met with her. They hugged for 30 seconds. 

 

‘Less words, more hugs’. You don’t always need to relate to what they’re going through, sometimes just letting someone know you’re there for them is enough. 

 

What was it like to be on American idol? 

 

He sang two songs, one standing up. He sang Stevie Wonder’s ‘isn’t she lovely’. Katie Perry took a shine to David's then-fiance, Christy. 

 

That audition now has over 60+Million views and so many opportunities came from the back of it. 

 

Did you know on Ellen the questions are all pre-set with pre-set answers? 

 

Advice for someone who wants to get into the music industry - anyone can do it nowadays. Getting attention is the hard thing and the way to do that is to consistently put out songs that are you. Learn about business and be proactively learning about how the industry works. Don't put pressure on yourself for your music to be absolutely amazing, just give yourself time, be patient and put stuff out consistently. 

 

Connect with David Francisco: 

www.DavidFranciscomusic.com 

Book and album are available spotify, apple music and all other good music platforms

 

Social media search: @davidfranciscomusic

 

Sick of negative Facebook groups?

Join the ENabled tribe:

Search Facebook or click: ENabled Warriors 

Or search Insta: DISabledtoENabled

 

Join the VIP waitlist to get the ENabled warrior Tracker Journal before anyone else click here to join through Facebook Messenger: http://mmini.me/waitlist

 

hero_3200x1200_f7e0cc8b-300a-44a4-a348-e 

This episode is sponsored by our friends at Beekeepers Naturals. Check out their natural medicine cabinet full of all-natural medicines that bees make.  Use code WARRIOR for 10% off. 

COVID19 chat with Hanna Boethius | How Switzerland and the UK are coping differently

COVID19 chat with Hanna Boethius | How Switzerland and the UK are coping differently

March 24, 2020

Warriors thanks for joining me for another episode of The disable to enable

1:00
podcast with me Your host Jessie as today's episode is sponsored by our friends at beekeepers naturals natural health products created by bees. The products are so good that I have not had a cold the entire winter. Did you know that without bees we'd have no coffee crazy. Check out mi.me slash Bs and use code warrior Timpson off today or click the link in the show notes by clicking this link by the way beekeepers naturals will give back to the disabled to enable podcast. Hey, no worries. Okay, we are here with Hannah Marie theists to have a chat about how the coronavirus is affecting her at the moment. So So Hannah is based in Switzerland, and I'm in the UK. So let's have a chat about how each of our countries are kind of dealing with this whole pandemic. Whatever the calling it now epidemic pandemic, I have no idea. It's all a very scary kind of time. So let's have a chat with Hannah about how she is feeling about the whole Corona virus type thing and what

2:00
She is doing to kind of keep yourself healthy. Hey, how's it going?

2:07
Yeah, um, well, thank you. Thank you for asking. I know these are very troubled times for a lot of people and there's I think there's actually most mostly worry and anxiety around rather than actual illness. Yeah, sure, we're getting excited about the illness rather than the actual illness. Thankfully still, but

2:27
I personally as we were talking about before, my routines haven't really changed.

2:35
Switzerland yesterday got new directives on what we should do and what we can and can't do and sort of thing and what we've been asked to do. Although I'm not Swiss, I have been living here for over 20 years now. So I consider myself more Swiss than anything else. And and it's basically it went from sort of events can have 100 people and restaurant and bars can have 50 people and you know, don't

3:00
overly interact with people and stay away if you're sick and wash your hands and all that all that normal stuff, but yesterday we got more directives and now it's really no restaurants are shut. All shops apart from grocery stores are shut yes stations are open medical care is open but basically everything else is everything social hairdressers are down and you know all small shops and I really, really actually feel very, very big heartache for all these people who are going to lose most or all of their income in business. For this time being a small business owner myself, thankfully everything for me is online, but for other people it's not.

3:43
And I just hope that everyone gets to stay healthy and happy and, and calm and peaceful through this

3:51
with the help of these directives and also, more over Switzerland also has basically close the borders. So that

4:00
You can only get in if you're Swiss or if you're, if you have sort of a permit to live here.

4:07
And both trains or public transport and, and flights and everything have been massively reduced, just to not keep people together. And it is, of course, a very, very serious situation. And I am glad that Switzerland is reacting in this way. Because then maybe we have a chance to actually flatten the curve. And I've been at home since Oh, about not even a week. But as we were saying before, my, my schedule hasn't really changed because I work from home and I sleep at home and I eat at home and in all these things. And in kind of visiting my businesses, I don't go out much during the week anyway. So it's not a huge thing for me to not have to stay home but be asked to stay home. And because of course

5:00
chronic conditions people and especially immune, or new people are one of the risk groups.

5:08
Yes, maybe a little bit more. So if you have a high blood sugar as a as in this specific case of diabetes, then if you have normal one, but still, we're part of the risk group. So I'm not really very sad

5:21
at home right now and try to do my part, show solidarity with those who have even worse than me, and to not be affected by this. So true. I really is so true. And I find it really interesting how each country is handling it a really different way as well. Like, I kind of feel like

5:41
England's been kind of kind of reactive more than proactive if I'm really honest.

5:51
So it sounds like someone's offering knives.

5:55
Sir

6:01
Did you?

6:10
Sorry about that? Yes. Yes. So England has been very reactive rather than proactive. Yes. Yeah, actually, I think I think it's the same for most European countries, unfortunately. Yeah, not until we started getting

6:26
serious in Italy. Did people realise Oh, we probably should do something others. Totally. I mean, like yesterday, so we had an announcement from Boris Johnson yesterday. And if you've not seen the video of Boris Johnson washing his hands while singing happy birthday to himself, I seriously recommend it because it's quite funny to us. And he announced yesterday that we now have to stay a metre away from everybody. So we have this social distancing thing going on, and if you'd have phased out as well. Now, it's way beyond that. Yeah. We unenforced that yesterday. Our scores

7:00
still open car homes are still open restaurants and bars and things and our ship but like, yeah, like you said, like I work from home as well. nothing's really changed for me right now other than my customer has been cancelled.

7:13
Two lessons, I have two lessons left.

7:18
So So yeah, that's that's kind of where we are really? Yeah, but I really find it almost the most fascinating part of all of this is actually seeing how different countries handle it, and how they react. Because now no one can be proactive anymore. Now it's all about reaction. It is all about reaction. Oh, yeah, no, no, it's just to try it with any sort of measures that you can to just stop it sort of thing, or at least slow it down.

7:46
I'm not actually, quite honestly, I'm not worried for myself. If I would get get it at some point. I'm not really worried. I know I can. My immune system has shown me time and time again, but it's quite

8:01
Awesome at what it does.

8:04
It seems so awesome that the only thing it's attacking is myself. So that's cool.

8:09
Santa's Same old, same old.

8:11
Anyway, jokes aside, but um, yeah, it's been very interesting to follow how people are and people's reactions to the sort of

8:24
not even regulations but recommendations.

8:27
And how many people just really don't care? Yeah, it's very, very scary for me as well, because, like, there was someone the other day

8:39
who was just kind of openly saying, Oh, yeah, glue. I Why are you in a public place right now? You should be quarantine. You know.

8:48
And that's the dangerous thing. I think people how people how seriously people are taking it as a big thing. Yeah. And I also find like, you know, being on social media right now. It's actually more exciting.

9:00
driving cars and anxiety driven as well, rather than informative and, you know, stating facts.

9:09
And that's actually caused me to use social media right now in a completely different way than I used to. Yeah, I guess that's something good. Something good. Absolutely. Yeah, I've been I know, I've been posting the enablers group, like,

9:22
what's everyone grateful for today? You know, like, what good things have you achieved? And then kind of

9:28
talking about activities that people can do at home? You know, for free, that's gonna be more productive than just sitting watching TV. Yeah, exactly. Yeah, Netflix is great. But you know, they it comes to point to point yeah, I mean, we're going to be in isolation for a long time. So, you know, we can

9:47
put until the, we're basically saying put until the 19th of April, at least. Well, everything always shows. Yeah.

9:55
Gosh, it's crazy, isn't it? I mean, the, I think out of everything, I think

10:00
Hopefully it will encourage people to think more ahead in the future, prepared for more things like this, because I feel like this is kind of just cover knocked us off.

10:10
Yesterday off by anything. It's just crazy. And so it's been over three months since the outbreak started in China. So we should have maybe got a little bit more ahead. But you know, maybe we'll learn till next time. But that's it, isn't it? And it's funny that you say that it's like it was like three months ago because me my partner don't watch the news at all. We don't have TV, we don't watch the news, or listen to news when it comes on the radio. So we were totally oblivious to this for about a week ago. We were like, what's been happening? Oh my god, this is insane. Like, why is why why did we not know others? And yeah, it's crazy. Really. So I'm hoping that it will just kind of go as fast as it came to be honest. Yeah, exactly. Yeah. actually saw one of my followers just said that yesterday on on Instagram.

11:00
It was really you know what shows up first we'll go with us. I'm like, okay with you. We'll give you that one. I hope you're right.

11:09
Hopefully. Yeah. Oh,

11:13
wow. Well, thank you so much for kind of giving your opinion and telling us informing us really what's going on in, in Switzerland. So I think it's really good to know. It's good to speak to the people that are actually in these countries rather than just what we hear on the news and things and TV and you know, what other people have read on social media. So yeah, exactly.

11:33
Thank you so much. It's lovely chatting to you. Lovely chatting you too.

11:37
Thanks so much. Are you ready to fight back against your chronic illness and go from being disabled to enabled?

11:44
Do you want to be an enabled warrior, someone who is brave, strong and confident, and someone who is ready to find a way to achieve awesome things despite a diagnosis.

11:54
This is your invitation. Check out disabled to enabled.com for articles and reviews

12:00
Find out how you can become unable to.

12:03
If you think this podcast is better than sleeping in on Sundays, take all that subscribe or follow button. Make sure to share the episode with someone who needs some inspiration. Join the enabled warriors tribe on Facebook and look out for our question posts. Before we go check out disabled to enabled on Instagram posts that tell it like it is.

12:23
Stay enabled

ENabled warriors thank you for supporting our sponsors BeeKeepers Naturals and their all-natural medicine cabinet. Protect yourself from the inside out to help prevent sickness with the natural anti-bacterial power of bees. 

57. David Francisco American Idol Star | Part 1 My accident left me paralyzed

57. David Francisco American Idol Star | Part 1 My accident left me paralyzed

March 23, 2020

RED+GUITAR+CROP.jpg?format=1000w

 

David’s life changed forever when he was cycling home for lunch. He was involved in a horrific car accident where I driver ran a red light, hitting David’s bike causing his body to be thrown 10 feet down the road. He blacked out and woke up with no feeling in the lower half of his body. 

 

He was told he would spend the rest of his life in a wheelchair. How would he do music now? How could he ask someone else to sacrifice so much to be with me? 

 

With no leg movement. He lost the use of his bladder and bowel function, a common thing with a spinal cord injury. 

 

David kept a positive mindset throughout the whole of his physical therapy journey. He admits he did grieve for a short time but what made it easier was that he was in the hospital for months. He learned everything again, including how to walk whilst in the hospital. He had the attitude of, ‘let’s make the most of whatever today is going to bring let’s not focus on the long term, and what might happen. We don’t know what tomorrows going to look like so let's not focus on it. He had amazing support from friends and family whilst in recovery. 

 

About a month after the accident was when he saw his foot move for the first time. A week later his other foot moved. Which is backwards, normally hamstrings and quads come back first. 

 

Motto was: if it moves put a weight on it. 

 

He spent 8 months in a place called The Shepherds Centre in Atlanta, Georgia which is an amazing rehab facility for spinal and brain cord injuries. Living in the hospital then moving across the street. He became fully independent in the wheelchair. He did a program where when he had enough strength he was in a device where he was attached to a harness on the ceiling and with a walker he eventually learnt to walk again with crutches after 8 months. He was still super weak and fell over if he bent his legs. He still had no quad strength

 

 years in and now he's walking independently can squat. Can’t quite jog or stand on his toes but he’s still seeing improvement. 

 

Being around others with injuries who were all in wheelchairs made the transition easier. He does still get looked at with his cane. When he doesn’t have the cane and is hobbling around, like in airports he’ll ask to pre-board and people will be rude about it because they don’t see the invisible disability. 

 

He feels totally comfortable and ok when he was in his wheelchair. And he started dating his now-wife whilst he was in the wheelchair. 

 

David has learned a lot about bladder and bowel issues. He describes needing to be in the ‘sweet spot’ for not eating and drinking too much so that you have an accident. He says you need to be careful so if he has too much at once it can be delayed and affect you at a different time to avoid having an accident. If you’re really constipated you’ll have an accident more easily because it’s pushing against the bladder all the time. It’s something he didn’t appreciate before the accident. 

 

Day to day David's legs are still quite weak and falls occasionally. He misses snowboarding, he did try to go and do it trying out a ‘snow go’ it’s a bmx for the snow. You can ride it down the hill just like skiing. that was a cool way to go down the mountain and didn’t stop me doing what I wanted to do. 

 

Does that affect him when on stage? 

 

If he’s doing a long performance he’ll try to move a little more he can go for around 45mins-1hour he’s so focussed when performing that he almost forgets things feel weak. 

 

Advice for a spinal cord injury? Don’t think about the long term, no one knows the future. There’s a lot you can do in a wheelchair that is amazing. 

 

Take it a day at a time and learn how to find meaning in your suffering. 

 

It’s not the cards you’re dealt in life, it’s how you play them that counts. 

 

You can’t control what happens to you but you can control how you respond. 

 

Connect with David Francisco: 

www.DavidFranciscomusic.com 

Book and album are available spotify, apple music and all other good music platforms

 

Social media search: @davidfranciscomusic

 

Sick of negative Facebook groups?

Join the ENabled tribe:

Search Facebook or click: ENabled Warriors 

Or search Insta: DISabledtoENabled

 

Join the VIP waitlist to get the ENabled warrior Tracker Journal before anyone else click here to join through Facebook Messenger: http://mmini.me/waitlist

 

 

This episode is sponsored by our friends at Beekeepers Naturals. Check out their natural medicine cabinet full of all-natural medicines that bees make.  Use code WARRIOR for 10% off. 

56. Celestine Fraser | Secrets of a film maker | Part 3

56. Celestine Fraser | Secrets of a film maker | Part 3

March 20, 2020

Part 3

 

Mrs Dalaway - viginia woolf  a celebration of life. Reminder of how much you can do in a day. 

 

Weirdest thing: played competitive table tennis, dressed up as her dog, dog and owner look alike competition, 

 

Amazing place - Sweden. Roadtrip with mum and two brothers the year her dad died. Flew to Gothenburg to Stockholm. 

 

Scariest thing - voluntarily going on a banana boat. Scarier things that were not so voluntary. 

 

Connect with Celestine:

www.glowwormfilms.co.uk

Twitter - @celestinefraser

Instagram - @celobean 

 

Sick of negative Facebook groups?

Join the ENabled tribe:

Search Facebook: ENabled Warriors 

Or Insta: DISabledtoENabled

 

Reduce stress now go to ENabledwarriors.org our free Facebook messenger 5 day stress course

 

______________________

hero_3200x1200_f7e0cc8b-300a-44a4-a348-e

 

This episode is sponsored by our friends at Beekeepers Naturals. Check out their natural medicine cabinet full of all-natural medicines that bees make.  Use code WARRIOR for 10% off. 

55. Celestine Fraser | Part 2 ill, actually a documentary about disability

55. Celestine Fraser | Part 2 ill, actually a documentary about disability

March 18, 2020

Part 2

 

We discuss gratefulness.

 

CFS had so much stigma, you get people saying ‘i’m tired too I had a late one last night’. When you tell people you have a genetic condition of EDS and PoTS they treat you differently. It meant I had better care and treatment from doctors because people took it more seriously. 

 

It took Celestine. I’m not I’ve ever come to terms with it, it’s something I’ll always be coming to terms with. As a child, you never think you’ll get any kind of diagnosis. It feels so good to have answers. 

 

I produced a short documentary, ill, actually. It follows 3 young people with difficult chronic illnesses and how they each navigate social media. Some are open about itt online and build communities around it and others don’t talk about it at all and others wouldn’t even know there was something wrong. 

 

We got funding and It all happened very very quickly, it was an intense process. We’d worked on it for about 3 years. Working out what story we wanted to tell.  Zoe Hunter-Gordon the director worked on it together. Learning about the research needed to be done. Reaching out to different charities. BRI/BBC scheme celebrating the anniversary of the internet. Aout embracing the digital. Got on to the born-digital scheme. 

 

How each of the people used social media to show their illness in very different ways. 

 

Ben - @benmudge_

Jameisha - @youlookokaytome/

 

They’ve all found ways to make a career alongside their conditions. 

 

Celestine couldn’t find any representation in films/tv that focused on young people with disabilities. It was born from an absence of representation. 

 

Is disability becoming a more socially recognizable thing? 

 

People relate to disability in a very obvious way, i.e. A Wheelchair. In programs, they use wheelchairs as a dramatic plot twist. The stores don’t have to be disabled storylines but wouldn’t it be nice if invisible disabilities were included in storylines?

 

Celestine set up her own production company Glow worm films so look out for that! She wants to focus on the people who don't have much representation. There are a lot of minorities that need representation too. 

 

Would you prefer to have an illness that’s invisible or visible and why? Let us know in the comments. 

 

‘Elderly people ask me to get up for them on the tube’ 

 

Hear Celestines advice for people newly diagnosed. 

 

Connect with Celestine:

www.glowwormfilms.co.uk

Twitter - @celestinefraser

Instagram - @celobean 

 

Sick of negative Facebook groups?

Join the ENabled tribe:

Search Facebook: ENabled Warriors 

Or Insta: DISabledtoENabled

 

Go to www.DISabledtoENabled.com for help and advice on how you can live well with a chronic illness

 

Reduce stress now go to ENabledwarriors.org our free Facebook messenger 5-day stress course

______________________

hero_3200x1200_f7e0cc8b-300a-44a4-a348-e

 

This episode is sponsored by our friends at Beekeepers Naturals. Check out their natural medicine cabinet full of all-natural medicines that bees make.  Use code WARRIOR for 10% off.

*CORONA VIRUS SPECIAL EPISODE* 1. Sneha Dave | How COVID-19 is affecting people with chronic illness

*CORONA VIRUS SPECIAL EPISODE* 1. Sneha Dave | How COVID-19 is affecting people with chronic illness

March 17, 2020

we are here with Sneha Davi let's have a little bit of a chat about the coronavirus because Coronavirus or COVID-19 is something that is affecting everybody right now. It is a global worldwide thing.
And for people with chronic illnesses it is you know, obviously a really worrying time for everybody, though, so say how whereabouts are you at the moment and how is it kind of affecting you? Yeah, so um, so I am also
classified as an immunocompromised individual. And so I think, you know, initially, it had been incredibly terrifying for me. And it still is because, you know, the more you hear about it, and the more you hear stories, it becomes even more anxiety-inducing, at least for me. And so I think, you know, the biggest thing, it's affecting every part of my life right now, as I'm sure it is for everyone around the world. But you know, for me, specifically, my university is now going to be entirely online, which is bizarre to me, because last year, we, you know, struggled to even cancel one day of school because of a snow day. And I go to a large public university, and so it brings in an additional challenging dimension. And so I think another thing is, too is that I currently cannot go home to my parents as well because my dad is a provider and he has seen coronavirus patients so for fear that he is a carrier because of the really
Easy to catch it is really, he does not want you to same location as he is. And so it's been kind of tricky to because I'm kind of stuck where no one is at my college, you know, college town. And that's been interesting as well. And and the other thing too is that I am in between infusions in starting different infusions. And so I really need to get on another infusion because my previous one causing allergic reaction and, but I'm just having to kind of wait this out because that will make me even more immunosuppressed and taking that's also been interesting, and I quite frankly don't even want to go inside a hospital right now. Um, because of the fear of COVID patients there as well. So I think it's been hard and also just my day to day things that I do like climbing, going to coffee shops and everything like that has been, it's just been kind of hard to be in my house, even though I have you know, went through a period of about five years of, of real isolation. This is
This kind of hits differently because right now I'm able to, you know, like, go outside and climb and stuff like that. Whereas earlier, I was really sick and I didn't feel like going anywhere. So isolation was a little bit easier at that time. Yeah, definitely. And I think, um, and it's the same for you, but I kind of feel like, it's not just the virus. That's scary, but I kind of feel like, I'm kind of scared of the public reaction to it. Yeah, in the UK, we've had lots of like, things like stockpiling and things like that CES, as you saw, you know, getting emptier and emptier and things like
that. they've, they've kind of been a little bit. And I don't know if this is right or not, maybe, maybe, but I kind of feel like they've been quite reactive in the government's approach to the coronavirus in the UK. I mean, it was only yesterday. Our schools are still open. And, wow, why? Things to select None for now, but they made a decision yesterday to put something in place called social distance.
You've heard about this. Oh, absolutely. Oh, yes. Yesterday a meter over away from everybody right now, apparently.
So we've got to stay away from everybody say, Yeah, like a meter away from everybody. And then they've closed bars and restaurants
and theatres and stuff like that. So, yeah, people are really kind of self-isolating at home now and right. It's a weird time to be alive. It's
really, it's really bizarre even my professors during my last class, because at that time, we, we had only had two weeks of virtual
classes. But as of a couple of days ago, the rest of the semester is virtual classes, but even our professors were like, kind of like it was nice to see you in person like this is probably the last time we're going to see each other in person. But I've been really surprised because I think I mean, our government had been very reactive. I think for a long time, but now it's becoming a lot more proactive. So social distance
Seeing is so popular and in particularly in Bloomington, Indiana, where I met, people have been really, really incredible about really maintaining, you know, if they're healthy, and they're not one of the high risk individuals and they're sitting at home still. And, you know, they're Yeah, it's it's really it's been really, actually really exciting. And it's, it's really made me see the sort of morality of people and tried to protect people that they don't even really know. And so I think that's been really powerful. And really, it's been really wonderful to see people actually taking it seriously even though they're, you know, if they get coronavirus, they might be, you know, able to recover pretty quickly. If there's something kind of amusing about it for me because like, so for years and years and years, I've been obsessed with my hand sanitizer and disinfecting surfaces and all that and they have mocked me so bad, but and now everybody's like, oh, there's no hand sanitizer anywhere and they're panicking. Oh, where have you been like this is my no
I know and even with soap I'm like, did no one use soap before this? Oh, yeah, ran out of all soaps and I'm just like, Oh, can you get everyone just start now? You
know? Yeah so it's been interesting is like you change and all the toilet paper sold out and I'm like I really toilet paper because I have ulcerative colitis data. So it's like it's yeah it's been I personally have not been prepared for this influx of purchases of necessities for myself. So yeah, I think if, if anything like
it kind of wakes you up to the realisation that actually this, this is kind of a thing that can happen, you know, like numerously so maybe we need to be more prepared in life and maybe it's teaching us to actually know start taking now that we can able to and absolutely don't know what's gonna happen. Yeah, and especially with climate change, it's like a whole new issue that like we need to be more prepared for this type of stuff. And I think it's, this is a great you know, and
A short lesson. Hopefully it is the last but I think it's a really great lesson for for our community to be prepared and just to know how to feel, you know, during these situations as much as possible and prepare for that. Yeah, I think one thing before we go one thing that has kind of annoyed me a little bit about rhinovirus thing is like, for for years and years and years going back, you know, people with invisible illnesses and chronic illnesses and disabilities, whatever you want to call them. They go to their employers and say, and their employers are like, Oh, no, you can't work from home, you can't do this. You can't do that. You know, it's like completely blanked out now. Like, everybody's just sick. And it's like, well, everybody must work from home and, you know, it's all of a sudden become really possible. So I thought, yes.
offices, how came the wait? Yes, absolutely. And even with our healthcare system, like being able to accommodate certain people and like get them care as fast as possible, I mean, you're completely right with the
working from home to me, I find that incredibly kind of hilarious in a way because it's like, you know, you're you're being so explicitly hypocritical right now, which is great that, you know, employers are taking this step to really promote social distancing. But you know, it is true for our community that we've really been silenced in that way for so long. And I guess this will bring up a lot of talking points after this pandemic. Can you
just imagine people going and got you like, Well, you did it for the COVID virus. Yeah, exactly. Exactly. It might encourage a whole lot more remote working anyway. Right? Right. It's a more efficient thing personally. Right, right. And giving people that option sincerely like when they're on days that they're not feeling well as a stay at home is really empowering. I think too, and, and you know, when you want to go into work, it's completely different because some people prefer that option but to have that option always available is I think it gives a lot of security.
For a lot of hours, it does nothing could be better for businesses as well in the long term because you didn't need all these huge massive buildings at the pace in which money for guys that you know, you're working even if it's just a few days of the week, you know, so
getting or whatever and the ultimate Yeah, absolutely. Yeah. Yeah, definitely interesting things. Yeah, absolutely.

Check out our guest Sneha Dave on the show in April 

hero_3200x1200_f7e0cc8b-300a-44a4-a348-e

ENabled warriors thank you for supporting our sponsors BeeKeepers Naturals for sponsoring this episode. Their natural medicine cabinet is the most natural, healthy way to keep well during this crazy time. 

54. Celestine Fraser | Glowworm Films Founder | EDS + P.o.T.S diagnosis

54. Celestine Fraser | Glowworm Films Founder | EDS + P.o.T.S diagnosis

March 16, 2020

Topics discussed:

 

What is Ehlers danlos syndrome (EDS) and post tachycardia syndrome (P.O.T.S)?

Ehlers danlos syndrome is a group of connective tissue disorders. Celestine has hypermobile ehler’s danlos syndrome. EDS is A deficiency of collagen - a protein - it’s the glue that holds your body together. 

 

Affects her joints by partial dislocations and causes chronic fatigue. puts a lot of pressure on the joints because the muscles aren't’ strong enough to hold them. 

 

P.o.t.s - is a dysfunction of the autonomic nervous syndrome. Body temperature, heart rate, digestion, blood being circulated around. 

 

Both multisystemic conditions. People go through good and bad patches. It’s not a progressive illness, it's a collagen deficiency from birth. 

 

“You’ve got a slightly wonky body that wasn’t built right.”

 

First signs, at age 17, noticed getting more tired than peers. Just after starting to drive, being taken to Abbey road by her driving instructor, Started having a terrible pain in her neck, thought she was anxious because of driving lessons. The pain got more and more intense. Lessons got shorter. She tried to just get on with A levels, but was getting more and more tired. 

 

She now thinks, ‘Maybe I should have intervened faster than I did’. 

 

Had a stressful time at home because her dad had been diagnosed with a type 4 brain tumour. He had to have major brain surgery. They all plodded on as best they could while he was going through treatment. 

 

This period of massive stress was when my symptoms started setting in. 

 

Stress is a major trigger with many people with P.o.T.S. Your body is in a flight or fight state constantly especially when your family is going through a really hard time. 

 

Celestine was in denial at first, worried people would think she had an anxiety problem and worried doctors would dismiss physical symptoms and put it down to anxiety. 

 

She was misdiagnosed with CFS, something a lot of young people particularly young women get diagnosed with. Most people diagnosed with that aren’t happy with the diagnosis because it’s more a diagnosis of the symptoms not the condition itself. She had symptoms that were different. Then she was dx with Myasthenia gravis - she couldn’t tell you a single thing about it now but at one time she was an expert. Celestine was put on a lot of steroids which made her self conscious as it affected her appearance. Then she went back to CFS and got really bad headaches. Saw a neurologist who was a headache specialist. He noticed she had a lot of markers for Hypomobility. He sent her to a rheumatologist. It was a big relief at the time. 

 

The diagnosis process is currently far too long at the moment. It needs to be sped up because people are becoming far sicker than they need to be and a lot of it is preventable. 

Hypermobile EDS doesn’t require expensive tests, it just needs a doctor to look at you and do the baker scale, hypomobility scale. Involves bending your body in a few different ways. It’s something GP’s could do it doesn’t require an expert. 

 

Never shared an illness story before because she felt she wasn’t taken very seriously by doctors because of age. 

 

Felt at times patronized by doctors and was diagnosed with anxiety in the first year of being ill. She says she doesn't think an 18-year-old girl is taken very seriously by doctors. You get told your body's changing anyway so new symptoms are just part of the deal. 

 

Connect with Celestine:

www.glowwormfilms.co.uk

Twitter - @celestinefraser

Instagram - @celobean 

 

Sick of negative Facebook groups?

Join the ENabled tribe:

Search Facebook: ENabled Warriors 

Or Insta: DISabledtoENabled

Go to www.DISabledtoENabled.com for help and advice on how you can live well with a chronic illness

Reduce stress now go to ENabledwarriors.org our free Facebook messenger 5-day stress course

______________________

 

Thank you to our friends at Beekeepers Naturals for sponsoring this episode. Check out their natural medicine cabinet full of all-natural medicines that bees make.  Use code WARRIOR for 10% off. 

53. Nitika Chopra | Part 3: My advice and the not-so-super-quick secrets | TV presenter & founder of Chronicon

53. Nitika Chopra | Part 3: My advice and the not-so-super-quick secrets | TV presenter & founder of Chronicon

March 13, 2020

Part 3: My advice and super quick secrets round. 

 

The 5 stages of grief. Everyone goes through it. Nitika’s best piece of advice is going to a therapist who gave her permission to feel sadness and trauma that affected her body. 

 

Don’t think you have to take any advice from any non-medical people. 

 

‘I have a team that I'm working with so thanks but no thanks.’ 

 

Connect with Nitika: https://nitikachopra.com/

 

Sick of negative Facebook groups?

Join the ENabled tribe:

Search Facebook: ENabled Warriors 

Or Insta: DISabledtoENabled

 

Go to www.DISabledtoENabled.com for help and advice on how you can live well with a chronic illness

 

Join the VIP waitlist to get the ENabled warrior Tracker Journal before anyone else click here to join through Facebook Messenger: http://mmini.me/waitlist

________________________

Thank you to our friends at Beekeepers Naturals for sponsoring this episode. Check out their natural medicine cabinet full of all-natural medicines that bees make.  Use code WARRIOR for 10% off. 

51. Nitika Chopra | Part 2: How I planned events/became a tv presenter and ran a magazine

51. Nitika Chopra | Part 2: How I planned events/became a tv presenter and ran a magazine

March 11, 2020

Part 2: Finding acceptance

 

Nitika describes going through phases of acceptance and phases of feeling low. 

 

Hitting rock bottom at 25 was tough but there was a level acceptance of ‘this is where I’m at’ I just have to figure this out and deal with it.’ 

 

Setting up something bigger than herself to help others. 

 

She set up Bella Life Magazine and had 100 people writing for the magazine, and started posting YouTube videos and online. She was soon approached by the exec of a production company and offered her her own talk show - naturally beautiful.  

 

‘I’ve officially done everything I could have to get me to this place.’

 

Nitika also discusses how she started running events and inspired by going to an event called, ‘curvy con’, she decided to set up a convention for chronic illness. 

Connect with Nitika: https://nitikachopra.com/

 

Sick of negative Facebook groups?

Join the ENabled tribe, all chronic illnesses welcome. 

Search Facebook: ENabled Warriors 

Or Insta: DISabledtoENabled

 

Go to www.DISabledtoENabled.com for help and advice on how you can live well with a chronic illness

Manage stress now for free go to ENabledwarriors.org Facebook messenger 5-day stress course.

________________________

Thank you to our friends at Beekeepers Naturals for sponsoring this episode. Check out their natural medicine cabinet full of all-natural medicines that bees make.  Use code WARRIOR for 10% off.