The DISabled to ENabled podcast
37 BE Alink: Founder of the Alinker bike

37 BE Alink: Founder of the Alinker bike

January 22, 2020

A slightly different kind of guest today. This guest doesn’t have a chronic illness but inadvertently created the most amazing mobility bike for people with chronic illnesses. 

*DISCLAIMER* Please be aware there is a lot of swearing in this episode. The opinions expressed in this episode are not those of DISabled to ENabled and are intended to spark discussion about issues relating to chronic invisible illness.

 

Topics discussed?

  • Mobility devices are designed to be a medical mobility aid that creates a social divide between people with and without a disability. The Alinker brides the gap between people with disabilities and without. BE set out to make something really cool so that people would be proud to use it rather than feel embarrassed. 
  • What is an Alinker?  A cool mobility aid for active people who want to stay active despite mobility challenges. It’s bright yellow and looks a bit like a racing mobile. 
  • It helps people gain mobility back in their lives. 
  • It means that people are seen on a cool bike at eye level and you can be approached by able people without judgment. It means that we can challenge people’s assumptions. 
  • Who is the Alinker for? The Alinker is for everyone who identifies as an active person and who wants to stay active. It’s also for misfits and rebels. 
  • Gender identity.
  • Why is the Alinker not considered a medical device? There is a very good reason. 
  • Should we rename the healthcare system to the ‘sick care system’? You’re then not focussing on the problem anymore. 
  • The problems facing our healthcare system. 
  • Climate change
  • How can we be improving climate change?
  • The Alinker began with BE’s mum not wanting to use a medical mobility aid. Actually, from that it turned into something far larger. 
  • Mobility devices are a technical item for a body with a problem. 
  • An Alinker makes you feel tall. It puts you at eye level. 
  • Veganism and vegetarianism. The meat industry. Awareness. 
  • Is an illness caused by environment? Or is it a factor? 
  • Building a farm in Kentucky to grow vegetables.  
  • Only Alinker users will be on the payroll by 2020. 
  • Friendship with Selma Blair
  • How the Alinker has grown to the level it has. 
  • This device is actively making people better. 

Connect with BE:

https://www.thealinker.com/

https://twitter.com/TheAlinker

https://www.facebook.com/thealinkerUSA/

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC3q2xq_IW56xUXmOKCrIlSg

 

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Thank you to Gousto for sponsoring this episode. Please note I do not promote anything I don’t use myself and I can safely say Gousto is my all-time favorite meal box product. I’ve used all the others but this is by far the best in my opinion. Get 60% off your first box and 30% off your first month of boxes (UK only) 

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36. Cheryl Hile: 53 marathons and 287 participants round the world

36. Cheryl Hile: 53 marathons and 287 participants round the world

January 15, 2020

cheryl-hile-sydney-marathon-0202-1562617

Mentioned in this episode:  

  • A marathon runner told to start resting after an MS diagnosis.
  • ‘I was afraid because I didn’t know what would happen to me so I just kept going’.
  • Symptoms vs. Marathon running. 
  • Cheryl's initial symptoms were painful and strong. She was told by her neurologist to wear an arm cuff to help with electric shock pain. Unsurprisingly it didn’t help. 
  • I was given no information about MS at the time of diagnosis. I didn’t know anything about it. I didn’t know it was a central nervous system thing. 
  • Despite the MRI showing multiple lesions in my brain but the doctor told her that he couldn’t diagnose her because there was a lack of clinical evidence. 
  • Everything I read online was so negative. My husband would find me at 3am googling MS in tears. 
  • When I started running again I started noticing problems with my foot. I realised it was a symptom called drop foot. Cheryl went to see her doctor and she told her to ‘lower her expectations’.  
  • Cheryl shows us her Ankle-foot-orthotic (AFO) (take a look on youtube) which helps her run with drop foot. 
  • Cheryl takes us through her best and worst marathons of all time. 
  • Running with her husband by her side, he’s there to stop her drifting off and to open water bottles. 
  • Cheryl Hile wants to encourage as many people with MS as possible to join her in her races to prove you can still do anything despite an MS diagnosis. 
  • In the last race she did, she got 
  • (contact details for Run A Myelin my shoes) 
  • I fell in love with running because of Cheryl Hile. Cheryl showed me it was possible. It’s pretty much free, you get outdoors, it minimizes anxiety and depression.  
  • My family and friends couldn’t understand that because you can run one day, you can’t necessarily do anything else the next day. 
  • How to deal with receiving hate messages. 
  • Learning to run when you have the most energy during the day and prioritising your health. People don’t understand that chronic illness conditions fluctuate. 
  • The worst thing someone can say to someone else with chronic fatigue… ‘I’m tired too.’
  • Having to leave the job you love because of the diagnosis and when other people are covering up your mistakes due to brain fog, it was time to leave. 
  • How Cheryl Hile keeps going alongside marathon running. 
  • Cheryl Hile shares her tips on how to get into running. Grab a calendar and start gamifying running.
  • I got started with running via the Couch to 5k app. I did it at lunchtime on weekdays so that there was nobody around. 
  • Questions from our ENabled warriors' facebook group. 
  • The big question of the episode: How do you manage the potty stops during the marathon?! 
  • Find out the weirdest thing Cheryl Hile has ever done… Warning, it’s pretty gross and involves snails.  

 

Get in touch with Cheryl:

www.cherylhile.com  

 

MS Connection blog mention: https://www.msconnection.org/Blog/December-2018/Run-a-Myelin-My-Shoes

 

Cheryl's blog:

https://www.cherylhile.com/category/run-a-myelin-my-shoes

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pink.orbea

 

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____________________________________________________

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35. Effie Koliopoulos | Juvenile idiopathic arthritis | My Story

35. Effie Koliopoulos | Juvenile idiopathic arthritis | My Story

January 8, 2020

new-about-me-pic.jpg

 

Effie from Rising Above Rheumatoid Arthritis (RARA) stops by to discuss all things RA. 

 

Starting 14 years ago when she was just a child. Effie was experiencing constant muscle pains, joint pains and inflammation. Fatigue, brain fog and she would come home from school and just sleep. Doctors passed it off as ‘growing pains’. 

 

She found herself sitting out more and more at school during gym class. 

 

Effie found it harder doing things on her own and she adapted as best as she could but still found it hard to be a young person.

 

Changing her diet practically overnight made things difficult going out with friends. Especially where alcohol is approached. 

 

‘I searched the internet constantly because the internet is the only thing that listened to me.’ 

 

Blogs mentioned: 

The RA guy

Barking dog shoes

 

I was expecting my diagnosis so that didn’t scare her but the medication was the thing that really scared her. What helped is throwing the side effects list into the garbage! 

 

The main way they diagnosed RA in Effie was by the blood tests and Xrays, the doctor also looked at Effies hands and knew straight away. 

 

We chat about the compassion of doctors. During one of Effies trips to the doctor the doctor told her that if she tried an alternative treatment she would be in a wheelchair. She learnt afterwards that he said that because she had a particularly aggressive condition and that it wasn’t advised to not take the medication, however, he could have said it in a much better way! Have you ever experienced a doctors comment like that? 

 

Effie wrote and starred in her own documentary.  Can you believe someone once called the cops of Effie for parking in a disabled space at a train station? 

 

Watch the documentary here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SrdgY1UY0g4&feature=youtu.be

 

She also gives her best advice for working with charities and starting a blog. Effie has worked with so many different charities, organizations and companies. 

 

Ever wanted to know more about arthritis? Effie talks us through what it is and the differences between the different types of arthritis. Did you know there are over 100 types? 

 

The type Effie has is. Click here to find out more about it: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis

 

Find Effie:

Blog: https://risingabovera.com/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/risingabovera/

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/risingabovera/

 

Are you ready to join a secret underground tribe of people that ‘get it’? 

Search for the ENabled warriors on Facebook to ask your questions in future interviews

Or follow us on Insta: DISabledtoENabled

 

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____________________________________________________

Have you ever felt out of your depth in the kitchen? Do you keep cooking the same thing?

Liven up your dinner tonight with Gousto and have meals like this... 

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34. Gynaecologist Dr Jonathan White: What you need to know about MS

34. Gynaecologist Dr Jonathan White: What you need to know about MS

January 1, 2020

Obstetrician and Gynaecologist Dr Jonathan White stops by to discuss all things related to Multiple Sclerosis, Gynaecology, diet, babies, exercise, more babies and lets us in on a few weird gynae things. 

 

Topics covered in this episode include: 

  • Dr white’s own MS diagnosis
  • How he deals with working in a busy hospital with MS symptoms
  • His top advice on diet (and how you can actually eat out at restaurants when you’re following a diet plan! 
  • His best tips for exercising
  • The miracle of growing a human inside another human (which when you think about it sounds really quite weird?!) 
  • The benefits of Vitamin D during pregnancy and how much you should really be taking!
  • How he met his wife over a c-section - how sweet is that?! 
  • Jonathan also answers questions from our ENabled warriors facebook group 
  • Sharks... Yep, that happened. 

 

Connect with Jonny:

overcomingMS.org 

Twitter: @jonty303

Instagram: @Jonnywhite1234

 

Join the ENabled tribe:

Search Facebook: ENabled Warriors 

Or Insta: Enabled_Warriors

 

Get your free messenger gift: bit.ly/5daystresschallenge 

 

____________________________________________________

Have you ever felt out of your depth in the kitchen? Do you keep cooking the same thing?

Liven up your dinner tonight with Gousto and have meals like this... 

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Get 60% off your first box and 30% off your first month (UK only) by clicking here: https://mmini.me/gousto

33. Irene Eagle: A parent’s perspective on their child’s diagnosis.

33. Irene Eagle: A parent’s perspective on their child’s diagnosis.

December 25, 2019

In this episode, I invite my mum over for a quick chat about her perspective on what it’s like having a child diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. 

 

We discuss what happened from my mum’s point of view at the start of my diagnosis--I didn’t actually tell her what was wrong until I left hospital and was back in my own apartment. 

 

Should I have asked her to come to the hospital? 

Or was I right to not say anything until after? I honestly thought I was helping.

 

My mum describes my diagnosis as a heartbreaking situation that she had no input in and where she was left ridden with guilt for not being by my bedside.

 

We talk about her role as a caregiver to other people with different chronic conditions (some even with MS) who needed full time carers, who were bedridden and one at the stage one lady who needed feeding. My mum told me none of this because she didn’t want to upset me. 

 

We also discuss how the care system is faulty with carers not being looked after or supported. Carers do too much and don’t get sufficient financial support

 

My mum and I discuss my first treatment I had - the dreaded injections. I will say, I know plenty of people on this particular treatment who are doing absolutely fine but for me, because I had no fat on my body for the medicine to go into and being drastically underweight, I found it extremely painful and difficult. Mum describes the one time she had to help me do an injection and how she thought it would be easier and more helpful for me to break my ‘injection ritual’ that I created to help me mentally be able to get through each one. She described it like ripping off a plaster. Listen to how that turned out. 

 

Funnily enough my brother also had to be called in to help with one, his reaction was hilarious. 

 

I asked my mum if anyone had ever suggested any ‘helpful’ holistic advice to her when she told them about my condition and surprisingly she said no. What she said next though, shocked me. 

 

She said that plenty of people were asking her about me and how I was coping but not one asked how she was coping with it. At the end of the day this was a huge thing for her too and was probably scarier for her than it was for me actually being diagnosed with the condition. 

 

What support is out there for family members who unexpectedly become caregivers?

 

We talk about the 4th annual MS lecture in London and hearing a lot of talks from different sciency people. My mums favourite was Professor Richard Reynolds who explained everything in layman's terms for us non-scientific folk. We learnt a lot there and I met so many people that I thought would make great guests on my podcast. 

 

Changing my mum’s sadness on how she thinks my life is and showing her that actually, there is a good side of MS. There is a side that makes me realise I need to live in the present. To appreciate life more. I don’t live with sadness or regret and I didn’t want her to think I lived with sadness and regret. So I think we cleared that up! 

 

Social media hides a multitude of sins and an important note is to not believe everything you read online. People only put out there what they want others to see. 

 

The delights of invisible symptoms! How do your family and friends react when you tell them about your invisible symptoms. 

 

Turns out I have A LOT of family members with chronic illnesses, I had no idea about that until I was diagnosed. Why is this? Why do people not talk about these health conditions? 

 

Early signs when I was young that could have been possible MS symptoms? My mum describes how I was ok with ballet because it had structure and a particular choreography but freestyle didn’t come naturally to me--was this because of early poor coordination? Or was I just really bad at freestyle dance? Also, Are you quite softly spoken and quiet? I was, my neurologist said that could also be an early symptom because it showed I was possibly struggling with the energy to make my voice louder. 

 

My mum also gives her advice for other parents going through a diagnosis with a child. Preparation is key, learning about the condition for yourself gives you a tool kit to be able to know what is happening so you can explain it to the child should they not understand or need a reminder of what’s happening in their body.  Remember to not try and take over a child's life and try to make things better because you can’t fix your child’s life they have to experience pain in order to encourage them to grow as people. 

 

Her answers for the quick fire questions had me in stitches. 

 

*Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a condition that can affect the brain and spinal cord, causing a wide range of potential symptoms, including problems with vision, arm or leg movement, sensation or balance.

  • It's a lifelong condition that can sometimes cause serious disability, although it can occasionally be mild.
  • In many cases, it's possible to treat symptoms. Average life expectancy is slightly reduced for people with MS.
  • It's most commonly diagnosed in people in their 20s and 30s, although it can develop at any age. It's about 2 to 3 times more common in women than men.
  • MS is 1 of the most common causes of disability in younger adults.

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/multiple-sclerosis/

32. Susan Carey - My 21st birthday was at one of my infusions!

32. Susan Carey - My 21st birthday was at one of my infusions!

December 18, 2019

Susan Carey - My 21st birthday was at one of my infusions!

 

Topics discussed in this episode:

  • First experiencing double vision. Seeing two golf balls and two basketballs, the optometrist asked her to leave the room while her mum was told there was something in the back of her eye. she could have a tumor or multiple sclerosis.    
  • Being officially diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis - a degenerative health condition at 14
  • A lumbar puncture done by a medical student. (A lumbar puncture is a common test done to diagnose Multiple Sclerosis. It involves extracting some Cerebral Spinal Fluid from between the discs in the spine and testing it) 
  • The people in Susan’s Irish village sent her Rosary beads, jumpers and mass cards through the post, was this right to send to a 14 year old diagnosed with MS? She was convinced she was going to die!
  •  Treatments and Multiple Sclerosis. We discussed the MS drug Avonex and Susan’s experience with the injectable drug. She was so terrified that her Father kindly stepped in to help her with it. 
  • After this she went onto Tysabri* (natalizumab) and then Lemtrada* (alemtuzumab) - both infusion treatments which means you need to stay in hospital or a few days. With Lemtrada you also need a few days of taking oral steroids before starting the infusion. 
  • Susan was told there was not a lot of research done around Lemtrada at the time. The nurse also didn’t know what it meant for fertility something which Susan hadn’t even thought about yet. She was told to go away and Google it, research everything about it that she could find and come to a decision on her own. 
  • Susan tells us about how she spent her 21st birthday in hospital doing an infusion and the doctors and nurses left balloons, cake and gave presents which made it far easier for her to deal with. 
  • Focussing on what you can do. Every day with her dad Susan would walk the length of the small pier in her hometown. She managed to do this after the Lemtrada treatment without holding on to anything. 
  • While she was in hospital, Susan decided she would not miss out on any of her diet or training programme so she packed herself some meals to have in the hospital and made a gym out of what she could find around the ward, like the stairs. 
  • Living through your teenage years without being able to do the things you absolutely lived for. 
  • Turning the hospital into a gym so she could keep up her fitness routine - even whilst being attached to an IV drip! 
  • Planning and prepping her own meals to take into hospital. 
  • There is no limitations around you, you can always work around things. 
  • Starting her own fitness coaching business after feeling unfulfilled in life called ‘fit fusion’ an inclusive disability fitness program. 
  • When the people in your life are supposed to be supportive but just make you feel inferior when you can’t do what they want you to do.  
  • A shift.MS takeover made her realise what the hardest part of her illness - family and friends’ unhelpful comments, suggestions and advice.  
  • Best advice for coping with Multiple Sclerosis? Suan says to network online with people already talking about their experiences. 

*Tysabri is an intravenous infusion (drip) once every four weeks to reduce the number and severity of relapses. It reduces the number of relapses by about two thirds (70%), compared to taking placebo.

Common side effects include dizziness, nausea, urticaria (a skin rash) and shivering.

Treatment with Tysabri may increase the risk of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), an uncommon brain infection that can lead to severe disability or even death.

(source: https://www.mstrust.org.uk/a-z/tysabri-natalizumab)

 

*Lemtrada is a disease modifying drug (DMD) for active relapsing remitting MS and very active relapsing remitting MS.

You take Lemtrada as an intravenous infusion (drip) in two treatment courses, twelve months apart. It reduces the number of relapses by about two thirds (70%), compared to taking placebo.

Common side effects include infusion-related reactions which are generally mild and short-lived and increased risk of infections following a treatment course. (source: https://www.mstrust.org.uk/a-z/lemtrada-alemtuzumab

Less common but potentially very serious side effects may also occur including thyroid disorders, kidney problems and blood clotting problems.

 

What is your experience with medication? Comment below.  

 

Connect with Susan:

https://www.instagram.com/coachsusanfitfusion/

https://www.facebook.com/coachsusanfitfusion/

 

Join the ENabled tribe:

Search Facebook: ENabled Warriors 

Or Insta: Enabled_Warriors

 

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31. Harper Spero: I have mould constantly growing in my lungs. Made visible podcast host

31. Harper Spero: I have mould constantly growing in my lungs. Made visible podcast host

December 11, 2019

Topics discussed in this episode:

  • Being diagnosed at 10 years old with a mystery skin condition.
  • Spending your teenage years covered in boils, warts and having your fingernails falling off whilst at school. 
  • Having a failing immune system and constant bouts of pneumonia at 11 years old.
  • Being so self-conscious at school about having your arms or any skin on show it became normal to cover up - even when in fancy dress costume. 
  • Being told at 27 to have surgery to remove a cyst the size of a GOLF BALL in your lung then being told by another doctor not to have the surgery because you might die. 
  • Finally being diagnosed with Job’s syndrome* or hyper-IgE syndrome a rare autoimmune deficiency typically occurring in people creating skin and lung issues, also dental issues. 
  • Finding a quality research hospital
  • Having a lobectomy to remove ¼ of her right lung - even though it was risky and doctors were afraid to.
  • Harper never shared anything with her friends until it was time to have surgery, leave work for a few months 
  • Harper didn’t find a community of people for some time but when she did she said it was so incredibly helpful and she wished she found them sooner. 
  • Treatment for Harper include daily oral drugs, a nebulizer and every two weeks, an injection. These all help with the functioning of her lungs. 
  • What’s the best, worst piece of unhelpful advice you’ve ever been given? Does a diet specific to your blood type really help with my condition that you know nothing about? 
  • What is the most annoying thing about having an invisible illness? Probably that it’s invisible. No one gets it. 
  • Is it right to self advocate and go against doctors advice when it doesn’t feel right to us?
  • Are meds to override symptoms worth the side effects?
  • Entrepreneurship. Should we all be entrepreneurs? 
  • Being a life and business coach and helping people start their own business  
  • Want to be an entrepreneur? Ask yourself what you like doing and what you’re good at. Don’t overthink it, just do it. 
  • Podcasting is an awesome medium for sharing peoples story’s, whether it be people with chronic illnesses, their caregivers, doctors, wellness practitioners, etc. It keeps it fresh and unique. 
  • Top tips for starting your own podcast
  • Top book recommendations: Just Kids by Patty Smith and Chronic resilience by Dana Horne 

(Job’s Syndrome: Autosomal dominant hyper-IgE syndrome (AD-HIES), formerly known as Job syndrome, is a condition that affects several body systems, particularly the immune system. Recurrent infections are common in people with this condition. Affected individuals tend to have frequent bouts of pneumonia, which are caused by certain kinds of bacteria that infect the lungs and cause inflammation. Inflammation is a normal immune system response to injury and foreign invaders (such as bacteria). However, excessive inflammation can damage body tissues. Recurring pneumonia often results in the formation of air-filled cysts (pneumatoceles) in the lungs. Frequent skin infections and an inflammatory skin disorder called eczema are also very common in AD-HIES. These skin problems cause rashes, blisters, accumulations of pus (abscesses), open sores, and scaling.

For unknown reasons, people with AD-HIES have abnormally high levels of an immune system protein called immunoglobulin E (IgE) in the blood. IgE normally triggers an immune response against foreign invaders in the body, particularly parasitic worms, and is involved in allergies. However, IgE is not needed for these roles in people with AD-HIES, and it is unclear why affected individuals have such high levels of the protein without having allergies.

AD-HIES also affects other parts of the body, including the bones and teeth. Many people with AD-HIES have skeletal abnormalities such as an unusually large range of joint movement (hyperextensibility), an abnormal curvature of the spine (scoliosis), reduced bone density (osteopenia), and a tendency for bones to fracture easily. A common dental abnormality in this condition is that the primary (baby) teeth do not fall out at the usual time during childhood but are retained as the adult teeth grow in. Other signs and symptoms of AD-HIES can include abnormalities of the arteries that supply blood to the heart muscle (coronary arteries), distinctive facial features, and structural abnormalities of the brain, which do not affect a person's intelligence. Source: https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/autosomal-dominant-hyper-ige-syndrome)

 

Download Harpers FREE guide to starting a podcast: https://harperspero.com/newbiesguide

Connect with Harper:

www.harperspero.com

@harper_spero

@madevisiblepodcast

 

Join the ENabled tribe:

Search Facebook: ENabled Warriors 

Or Insta: Enabled_Warriors

 

Are you affected by stress? 

Everyone is raving about our 5-day stress challenge! Test it out for yourself: www.ENabledwarriors.org and click ‘Get started’ on Facebook Messenger. 

30. MBE Kadeena Cox: Smash the rules, achieve your dreams.

30. MBE Kadeena Cox: Smash the rules, achieve your dreams.

December 4, 2019

 

Topics covered in this episode:

    • Being a physically fit and active child doing dance and playing hockey before starting in athletics. Kadeena had also done multiple degrees including one in physio which she had to leave 9 months in, due to having a stroke in May 2014. 
    • Becoming an MS (Multiple Sclerosis) warrior in September of the same year. 
    • Always wanting to be an Olympic athlete and thought she thought she was destined for the 200m sprint. She was then told that to get to an international level she’d have to become a 400-meter sprinter. That’s when things started to go wrong. 
    • Kadeena was on the start line of a race but wasn’t able to move her leg. 
    • Physio told her it was probably just something tight in her back and to stretch it out. 
    • Telling your family and friends from the get-go that you want to be independent and if you need help you’ll ask, but how do you do that in a nice way? 
    • How Paralympic classifications are given--there is a lot of testing! The classification process and the differences between the different classifications. Read more about that here 
    • Working hard to train for competitions whilst battling extreme fatigue.
    • Disordered eating and how it is affecting training for Kadeena.
    • Going from 10 training sessions per week to being bed bound for 3 months meant Kadeena put on weight that affected her mentally and physically. 
    • Female athleticism and the ‘fat-shaming’ pressures female athletes are under when they wear their athletics outfits. 
    • The dangers of bulimia, using laxatives and excessive fasting. 

 

 

  • Discussing disordered eating issues with friends and family. How they can help. 
  • Are fellow competitors friends or foes when it comes to socialising with them outside of athletics events? 
  • Being invited on reality TV shows like The Jump and Bake Off. 
  • A love of baking cakes for someone who has disordered eating? It’s a thing. 
  • Awkwardly meeting Royalty whilst super hungover (oops!) 
  • Find out who Kadeena’s favourite royal is and why! 
  • What it’s like getting an MBE (which FYI stands for ‘Member of the British Empire’!)
  • How you should live for today because you never know what will be taken away.
  • Kadeena’s favourite book might surprise you.
  • Kadeena’s weirdest thing will definitely surprise you.
  • Why everyone needs to visit Jamaica! 
  • The athlete that broke all the rules and lived to win the medals. 
  • Follow Kadeena on #Insta and #FaceyB (Kads words, she's cooler than I am!) 
  • Read Kadeena’s ‘12 months to Tokyo’ blog. 

 

Fact: Kadeena Cox became the first Briton since 1988 to win a medal in two sports at the same Paralympics as she took cycling gold in Rio. Cox, who took T38 100m athletics bronze on Friday, won the C4-5 time trial as Dame Sarah Storey finished fourth.

Join the tribe and become ENabled!:

Search Facebook: ENabled Warriors 

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29. Beccy Huxtable: I was grateful to be diagnosed with MS live on air! Radio producer

29. Beccy Huxtable: I was grateful to be diagnosed with MS live on air! Radio producer

November 27, 2019

 

In this episode, we discuss a lot about pregnancy including Beccy’s advice for having a baby with Multiple Sclerosis! 

Have you heard of the ‘crazy sheep thing’ that makes womb sounds? 

How are you supposed to react when the same people give you the ‘helpful advice’ (that FYI  doesn’t work) over and over!

How can you find other mums going through pregnancy at the same time? 

The tips and tricks Beccy has for looking after a baby with MS. 

 

Connect with Beccy here

Or go to Instagram.com/Beccyhuxtable

Beccys Twitter

Or go to: https://twitter.com/beccyhuxtable

 

Read Beccy’s articles on multiple sclerosis here:

https://www.mssociety.org.uk/authors/beccy-huxtable

 

https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/420646/I-discovered-I-had-multiple-sclerosis-live-on-the-radio?fbclid=IwAR2Tv5Hdg4dxKhsD1nli6ZxJ4Nla-WehctOLIl3c7nvW3aMwgWCZLcuSJ2o

 

Scott and Beccy go behind the scenes of MS research:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5bNsrr1afeI

 

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28. Shelley Ramsey DeJongh | I started my life again… addiction free with Multiple Sclerosis

28. Shelley Ramsey DeJongh | I started my life again… addiction free with Multiple Sclerosis

November 20, 2019

Topics covered in this episode:

  • First MS symptoms
  • Being predisposed to addiction
  • Endometriosis 
  • Postpartum depression
  • Being a counselor in a prison
  • Setting up a business
  • How can people with chronic illness heal? 

Connect with Shelley:

Website: https://www.shelleyramseydejongh.com/

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/shelley_ramsey_dejongh/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/shelleyramseydejonghteletherapy/

 

Join the ENabled tribe:

Search Facebook: ENabled Warriors 

Or Insta: Enabled_Warriors


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